Ribbonwinners Tatting Patterns & Shuttles by
Georgia Seitz
11460 Via Appia
Anchorage Alaska 99515-2905 USA
AKTATTER@aol.com
www.georgiaseitz.com


Greg Stanton's October Snowflake of the Month




Many thanks to Greg Stanton for sharing his original pattern with the online tatting class!

Using 2 shuttles wound CTM begin the center ring.
R 3 ds, 5p sep by 3 ds, 3 ds
Create an untied mock picot where the threads from both shuttles are measured to approximate the length of a regular picot and climb out into the split ring. (Remember if climbing out to a chain then you have to create a tied mock picot with a lock join.)


Round 2: Split ring 6-6
*Chain 8
SH 2, make 2 rings 6 p 6
Chain 8 ds
R of 6 ds, join to next picot of center ring, 6 ds
*Repeat all around the center and finish off.

You cannot climb out of this round, unfortunately. (Weellllll.... you could.... but it would mean two split chains in very awkward positions and may well look better if made in two steps.)

Round 3: *3 rings (trefoil) of 6 p 6
Chain 8
With SH1 make jk (josephine knot) of 12 single stitches [use first half stitch or second half but be consistent. It’s also important to grip the completed JK tightly when commencing the following chain]
Chain 8
R 6 p 6
R 6 + 6
Chain 8
Jk with SH1, 12 stitches.
Chain 8
R 6 + 6
R 6 p 6
Chain 8
Jk with SH1, 12 stitches
Chain 8
*Repeat around to first trefoil, making joins as indicated by the sample. Finish off.


Note: Making smaller joining picots would form a rounder “rosette” pattern between the rounds.

The pattern is easy to keep in your head because all the rings, with the exception of the center ring are 6 p 6, or 6 + 6. The chains are all 8 ds, and the josephine knots are all made of 12 single stitches with the FIRST shuttle. This causes them to be on the opposite side of the chain on which they normally appear.


Greg used Dale Pomeroy’s (See the lesson "Starting at the end" from last year on the Learning center page.) method of finishing the ends, but it proved to be very tedious If you don’t already know what his method entails, it involves splitting the threads into 3 strands each, threading them through a size 15 (!) beading needle, and sewing the threads back into the work. The virtues of this method are that it adds little bulk to the work, is nearly invisible, and is much sturdier than the magic thread trick. Downside, it’s a pain in the [neck].



Any questions? Email Greg direct: Greg Stanton

Starting at the End

AKTATTER@aol.com