Priscilla's Shamrock This is an excerpt from Book 2 of the Ribbonwinners Series, "Tatting: It 's Not Just Doilies Anymore!" Georgia Seitz 1994 <br>

Priscilla's Shamrock This is an excerpt from Book 2 of the Ribbonwinners Series,
"Tatting: It 's Not Just Doilies Anymore!" Georgia Seitz 1994

This pattern is very easy to indiviualize. Simply adjust the size of the rings number of picots on the chains to suit your eye. The basic method is to make the rings in a row with about " space of thread between them. The middle ring should be slighter larger than the others. There should be an odd number of picots as center picot (slightly smaller than others) of each of these rings is used twice as a join for the outer chainwork.

The picots of the rings should be relatively small. The second row of chainwork picots should be a little larger and the last row of chainwork should have good picots. This is a suggested pattern. You may add or drop picots as you like as just remember you must maintain a balance to the work and preserve any picots used for joins. You may also want to use a gauge to measure the size of the picots. The areas just before and after the joins should be free of picots to add definition to the shamrock shape

R 11 picots separated by 3 DS cl ring. Leave " space. Do not turn.
R 13 picots separated by 3 DS cl ring. Leave " space. Do not turn.
R 11 picots separated by 3 DS cl ring. Leave " space. Turn.

Work the next rows all in chainwork around the outside of the rings attaching chains to the center picot of each ring and the two spaces in between rings.

CH approx 9 picots separated by 2 DS (Add or subtract DS to reach the picot or space where join is to be made.) Attach to ring with the shuttle join. Repeat, attaching space between rings.

CH approx 11 picots separated by 2 DS. Attach to ring with the shuttle join. Repeat, attaching to space between rings.

CH approx 9 picots separated by 2 DS. Attach to ring with the shuttle join. Repeat attaching to space between rings. Do not turn. Do not cut thread.

Second row of chain work:
CH approx 11 picots separated by 3 DS (Add or subtract DS to reach the picot or space where join is to be made.) Attach to ring with the shuttle join. Repeat, attaching to space between rings.
CH approx 13 picots separated by 3 DS . Attach to ring with the shuttle join. Repeat, attaching to space between rings.
CH approx 11 picots separated by 3 DS . Attach to ring with the shuttle join. Repeat, attaching to space between rings.
Stem: After attaching last chain segment continue to chain approx 2". Make a small picot, chain 6 DS and join back into that picot. Tie and cut. Whipstitch or glue or hide ends properly in back.

Supplies needed to easily make shamrock into a pin to wear:

For Shamrock Pin, you need a pin back (approx. " oval; adjust to fit size of thread used), hot glue and a heart- shaped green faux gem. Starch shamrock heavily or use fabric stiffener and pin out the picots. When dry, attach to pin back with small of hot glue and use faux gem to cover glue by placing it directly in the center. Size 8 thread will make shamrock about 3" in diameter.

Subj: The use of the picot gauge in tatting
Date: 9/26/98 5:59:16 PM EST
From: AKTATTER
To: AKTATTER

The Picot Gauge
Georgia Seitz 9-26-98

The picot gauge is a measuring device used while tatting to insure picots of an exact size, graduated in size as an additional design element, or of a certain length for the purposes of construction, i.e., joining.

The picot gauge may be cut from paper, plastic, quilting template material, wood, cardboard etc. Individual pieces for each width may be used or one gauge with different widths cut into it.

Alternatively, a ruler with measured increments can be used. This type gauge is most often affixed to the working surfacing and the tatting brought close to it to accomplish the measurement. The last double stitch is held next to the "0" on the gauge and the thread held taut while the first half stitch is applied and drawn up to the measurement required. Pressure is applied to the half stitch so that it does not draw up farther while the second half stitch is formed. Then the completed double stitch slides over next to the previous one and the loop of thread is forced out into the picot. Using the same measurements each time, insures regularity in size.

The picot gauge which is held in the hand while the tatting is accomplished is held in either of two ways; vertical or horizontal.

Vertical

The gauge is placed next to the completed double stitch and the working thread, i.e., that which goes around the left hand is lifted over the gauge. The gauge at this point is completely vertical. It is at a 90 degree angle to the line of tatting and/or the left forefinger. The width of the object used as a gauge physically stops the next half stitch and holds it in place while the second half stitch is formed. The gauge is then removed. The completed double stitch then slides over next to the previous one and the measured picot is formed. The gauge will need to be removed after each picot when held vertically.

Horizontal

The gauge is placed next to the completed double stitch and the working thread, i.e., that which goes around the left hand is lifted over the gauge. The gauge at this point is completely horizontal. It is parallel to the line of tatting and/or the left forefinger. The width of the object used as a gauge physically stops the next half stitch and holds it in place while the second half stitch is formed. The gauge may be held in place while tatting continues. The following double stitches are made normally. The working thread will be behind the gauge. When the next picot is needed, again lift the working thread over the gauge and form the half stitches. In this manner, a number of picots can be placed on the gauge and remain there until the ring or chain is ready to be closed or tightened.